Archive for the ‘Vegetables’ Category

A guide to the best natural pest controls

Anybody who has attempted to grow something in their garden will be all too aware that
pests have a way of rearing their ugly little heads very quickly indeed! Sadly, the first
response for many gardeners is to head to their garden shed and reach for the pesticides in
order to get rid of their problem as quickly as possible. While this may be the quickest way
to solve the problem, it is most certainly not the greenest! Pesticides can have an adverse
effect on the environment, meaning that a quick-fix is not always the best remedy.

This is now finally being understood by those who make their living from the land; with
nature in mind, many farmers are now employing integrated pest management techniques
in order to protect their livelihood for the long-term – in essence, people are now making
much more of an effort to strike a balance between protecting their crops and protecting
the environment!

Fortunately, there are plenty of natural and organic methods that gardeners can employ
when attempting to rid themselves of would-be garden invaders! Below are some of the
methods of saving both crops and the planet:

Smells like trouble – many common garden nuisances (such as foxes) can be deterred with
the employment of strong smelling substances. The most commonly used substances that
can be turned into a stinky “keep out” sign are garlic, fish, rhubarb and tobacco.

Hot hot heat – would-be garden invaders can be sent packing with the use of a little heat;
this can include chillies, kerosene, methylated spirits and even table salt!

Odour eaters – many readily available garden plants give off natural odours that can be
extremely uninviting to bugs and other pests. This is nature’s way of informing the bug that
the plant probably carries some form of natural insecticide; it also lets it know to keep well
away!

Get slick – commonly found oils can be a great way of controlling certain kinds of garden
pests. Some tried and tested oils include mineral oil, vegetable oils and proprietary oils.
These can kill soft-bodied invaders by clinging to them and eventually causing suffocation.

Clean up your act – a little-known pest controller comes in the form of soap. Ensuring that
the soap is natural and vegetable-based is the best way to make sure that it will not harm
the plants as opposed to the pests!

How to grow bigger garlic cloves

Back in 2009 I wrote the article about growing garlic.  One quy sent me a question about growing bigger garlic cloves.

If you want to grow bigger garlic cloves you need to do the following:

Be sure you are starting with the biggest cloves in the bulb only. Remember, in this case the size DOES matter! 😉
Garlic loves sun. So plant it in the sunny areas.
Make sure the soil is well drained. Otherwise garlic will root.
Fertilize it. Garlic loves manure. Some people say that chicken manure giver great results but I didn’t try it yet.
Don’t forget to weed garlic.
Remove scapes or garlic false seedheads. Otherwise they will take energy and power from your garlic cloves. By the way, garlic seedheads are delicious when young! You can cook them in oil and enjoy their great taste!
Harvest garlic in the right time! The right time to harvest garlic is when the bottom three leaves are brown.

Read also:
Growing and planting onions
Growing watermelons
Growing Morel mushrooms

Help the world! Use paper pot maker!

Gardening in Our Backyard Is Growing On Us

Snowdrops at Heale House in WiltshireImage by Anguskirk via Flickr

My wife, Jenny and I haven’t been gardening for long but the desire has been there for many years. We have been married for 27 years and now we finally have our very own backyard big enough for both flowers, trees, shrubs and as of 2009, a vegetable garden as well.

It’s about -27 here today and the wind is pretty strong making it bitter cold so I am staying in my office and planning my garden season for 2010. Nice and toasty in here with my coffee and music.

We started gardening here the year we purchased the property. We even purchased the lot next door so we could have room for a vegetable garden. We didn’t start with a vegetable garden because my health was pretty poor when we bought this home. So we started with a few flowers and then moved on to a few containers for strawberries and tomatoes.

After that we were hooked and I managed to dig up a vegetable garden plot, 4×16 feet and started square foot gardening in 2009. We had a great experience, learned a bunch of things NOT to repeat and some things that will help us do better in 2010.

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Growing peppers

Growing peppers is very easy. Like the majority of plants, they require sun and warmth.  Plant them after the last frost as cold will kill them.

How to plant peppers

First of all you need to prepare a place. It should be well-tilled raised garden bed with a plenty of compost or manure.
Most peppers require about 6-12 inch of space between each other. Check the information on the sachet for your ones. If you want to grow Chili peppers, then the space should be about 1-3 inches between.
Make a holes about 0.5-1 inch deep and place one seed in each hole. Then cover them up.
Water the place after planting and keep them well watered aspecially during the time of flowering. Try to keep it weed free as well.
Each sort of peppers have different time of maturity. It can take from 2 to 5 months to get peppers.

Some advanced facts, that may increase your harvest: peppers like a soil Ph of 6.7 to 7, about an inch of water a week, and a dusting of Epsom salts worked into the soil for the magnesium needed to thrive. If the soil is very warm, mulch around the plants to retain moisture. Use a well balanced fertilizer when blooms appear and again a few weeks later.


Read also:
How to plant wild strawberries
How to grow carrots

Help the world! Use paper pot maker!

How to grow carrots

Carrots. This vegetable is loaded with vitamins, taste good, help to control your weight, good for your skin and blood.

There are a few ways of planting carrot home garden seeds. But before planting them don’t forget to prepare soil. Work it deeply adding some compost or peat moss. Try to remove stones as in may affect downward formation of the roots.

Carrot seeds are one of the smallest of home garden seeds and it is important to thin the seedlings before crowding impairs their growth. There are two tricks you can use:
1) You can add several scoops of fresh coffee grounds to the mixture. It will help you space the carrot seeds by increasing the volume you have to pick up. The grounds will also help repel pests, as well as help fertilize the soil.
2) Also you can add some radish home garden seeds to the mixture. The radishes will sprout first, so you will be able to see where your rows are. It will also help you space the carrots out more when you cultivate them.

After the carrot home garden seeds have germinated, I recommend you to thin them to two inches apart.

Keep them well weeded early in the season. Carrots are easily overcrowded, and weeds usually winning out.

They also need a good supply of water, in soil that drains well. They respond well to fertilizer applied prior to sowing carrot seeds, and a couple of times during the season.

Carrots are ready to pick approximately 65 to 75 days, depending upon their sort.

Buy carrot seeds from my shop for just 5$ including the delivery!

Organic Home Garden Seeds for Sale. Carrot Karlena

Carrot Seeds “Karlena”
The late-ripen sort. These carrots are very good for storage during the winter time. The carrots are crunchy, juicy and sweet. The seeds are for planting during March-middle May. Plant them leaving 25-30 cm between the rows. Thin out leaving 5-8 cm between the plants.
[wp_cart:Carrot Seeds Karlena:price:5.00:end]

Have a look on my other home garden seeds!

Read also:
Use paper pot maker
Grow plants from seeds

(c) Home Garden Seeds

I wish I could be read better in Spanish, but I found a great site that will be of help with my veggies. Most tutoring net companies just sell netting and have no real expertise in agriculture. Hortomallas has a great library available to farmers as tutora means tutor as referred to a plant. I ran into this site by mere chance as I was trying to find the ideal product to tutor my backyard vegetables, and did not know that using netting reduces viruses and fungi. I will try now to go 100% organic!