Posts Tagged ‘Grass’

Tips for Lawn Care

The spring is coming and everyone who has a garden has to think about lawn care.

Springtime lawn care and maintenance varies depending on your region, but there are some things that are common whether you live in a warm or cold climate. These standard jobs are the following:

Pulling weeds out
Applying some compost tea
Trimming with low blade
Aerating and de thatching.

These simple jobs play an important role in lawn care, so be sure to take your time.

With summer comes our favourite lawn care and maintenance job – regular lawn trimming!
Many people remove the lawn clippings after mowing. It is better to leave them – lawn clippings are a great source of nutrients for your soil. Instead of bagging grass clippings when you mow, recycle clippings back into the soil.

There is no perfect advice of what type of lawnmower to use – a rotary mower, a riding mower, a reel mower, or a walk behind. And it is up to you to decide whether to use a petrol lawnmower, gas, electric, battery, or manual powered. The choice depends of your financial situation and the amount of comfort you want to have during a lawn mowing. I know that very popular choice is bosch rotak lawnmower because it is easy to use.

Another summer lawn care and maintenance job is watering. Now, watering is a tricky task. You have to avoid over or under watering your lawn. The perfect solution is a slow steady water once a week. Grass lawns require a minimum of 1 inch per week of water (or as much as your local water restrictions allow). It can be achieved in about 30 minutes of watering. Don’t water your lawn in the heat of the day as you will just waste water to evaporation. Water early in the morning instead, to maximize the moisture on your lawn.

Also you have to do jobs such as monitoring the insects (some good, some bad), attentive weed control, watching for lawn disease, and applying a calcium rich fertilizer.

Another tip to finish a lawn off is to use a cordless strimmer to trim the borders of the lawn. Visit cordlessstrimmerguide.com for more information on using cordless strimmers.

I wish I could be read better in Spanish, but I found a great site that will be of help with my veggies. Most tutoring net companies just sell netting and have no real expertise in agriculture. Hortomallas has a great library available to farmers as tutora means tutor as referred to a plant. I ran into this site by mere chance as I was trying to find the ideal product to tutor my backyard vegetables, and did not know that using netting reduces viruses and fungi. I will try now to go 100% organic!